Monday Map – 1965 Selma March

The Selma March Historic Byway

Martin Luther King Day

On March 7th, 1965, the historic Selma to Montgomery March took place. Hundreds of marched in support of civil rights for all Americans, and expressly for the rights of African-Americans subjected to institutionalized segregation and bigotry.
The march was blocked by Alabama state troopers and aborted. A second march on March 18th was cancelled due to a court order.
Over 25,000 gathered on March 21st, and with the help of federal troops and law enforcement, they completed the 54 mile trek to the state capital in Montgomery.
While the reality of who Doctor King was and what is actual legacy has been. There is no question that assassinated leader stands today as a martyr to social justice in America. And the Selma March remains one of the most tangible symbols of the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.
The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was introduced in Congress during the Selma March, and once passed became among the most far-reaching pieces of civil rights legislation in U.S. history.
Selma http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways/byways/2050/maps

The route of the Selma March is now one of the Federal Highway Administration’s America’s Byways and also a National Park Service Historic Trail that is currently closed due to the ongoing attempted Right Wing coups that has shut down the Federal Government.

Selma http://www.nps.gov/common/commonspot/customcf/apps/maps/showmap.cfm?alphacode=semo&parkname=Selma%20To%20Montgomery
A period map from the time: HERE
More Monday Maps: HERE

A Distorted Les Paul

The auditorium was full.

Granted we’re not talking about the Beacon, but still, hundreds.

My distortion, overdrive, delay, chorus were all dialed in and the stack was warm and smoking. Then came that moment when you can tell they have turned it up in the house. The bass was still being fiddled with for the onstage mix, but we were seconds away from being introduced and kicking off the opening number, when I struck a growling chord on my Les Paul that made the front rows snap wake. And that was when the acoustic guitar licks went off on my phone. What a time for a call!

And then it was like in Cosmos or Bill & Ted when I was suddenly yanked back and upward, my guitar and leather jacket dropping away as I soared through a whirring worm hole of spacetime… And before I even opened my eyes I could tell it was a bright, sunny day, and I was awake and back in my bed.

“Nooooooo! Take me baaaaack!” I moaned.

I guess it’s time to change my ringtone.

R.I.P Sister Wendy Beckett

The art historian, Catholic nun was 88

Every time she opened her mouth, Sister Wendy Beckett made me happy.

Like Thomas Becket centuries before, Sister Wendy Beckett devoted her life to the Church of Rome. But she also gave the gift of art appreciation to millions who watched her on television in the 1990s, first in a series called Odyssey, and later in the History of Painting.

I would often stumble upon her programs while channel surfing, but I was always glad I stuck around to see what she happened to be discussing at that particular moment.

Do yourself a favor and start watching this first episode from the History of Painting (1996.)

I never knew much about her other than her TV programs. Like for instance, she lived in a camping trailer, what in England is called a caravan, on the grounds of a monastery in Norfolk.

For those interested in learning more, here is the BBC’s official obituary

 

Winter Solstice – birth and rebirth

Io, Saturnalia!

Annum novem faustem felicem vobis!!

Saturnalia Solstice

The Winter Solstice begins at 5:23PM, Brooklyn, New York time.

At the death and reincarnation of the natural year, I am happy to announce a return to regularly scheduled blogging!

I have been undergoing a couple of years of troubling issues that impacted my ability to spend much time writing and typing, and playing the guitar – the three things I can do well enough to earn some sort of living.

At the moment some of the various therapies I have undergone are allowing me to risk doing such things more often and, hopefully, henceforth and ever after, as much as time and tendons allow.

At this the darkest time for the northern hemisphere, and in many ways the darkest time that America and the entire planet have seen perhaps ever since humans walked here, I am wishing for a brighter, happier year ahead for all, and the ability to cherish peace, love, hope, healing, charity, and open-hearted, open-minded tolerance, while wishing for all the strength to resist, endure, and ultimately overcome the baser human weakness toward war, hate, despair, greed, pollution, and heartless close-minded bigotry.

Many of our secular Christmas traditions of gift giving and good will come from the joyous celebrations within the Roman festival of Saturnalia, which the historian Catullus called “the best of days.”

Here’s to hoping our best days still lie ahead, and will arrive sooner than we can yet imagine.